Hamlet By Shakespeare

Hamlet By Shakespeare The first Soliloquy of Hamlet appears in act one scene two. It falls after Claudius and Gertrude announce their marriage to the kingdom, and before Horatio and Marcellus tell Hamlet about seeing the ghost. Shakespeare loads this Soliloquy with stylistic devices that help introduce themes, show conflict, show character, and set the tone. We first see a metaphor comparing Hamlet’s flesh to melting ice. This indicates how depressed he feels. He wishes he could melt away and die, but he doesn’t kill himself because it is against the law of the church. The apostrophe “O God, God,” along with the personification of the world show the desperation and sadness of Hamlet.

“Tis an unweeded garden,” is the beginning of a metaphor that extends throughout the book. Shakespeare is comparing Denmark (in what is more seeable in later soliloquies) to Eden. This is the beginning of a major theme throughout Hamlet. That is the theme of corruption, and how it spreads. Next we see that how great of a King Hamlet Sr.

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was compared to Claudius. This is done through the metaphor “Hyperion to a satyr.” Shakespeare also uses alludes saying that the King would shield the winds from heaven from Gertrude’s face. This displays the reader how loving a husband he was. Then a rhetorical question is use to show how painful all these memories are to him. Now we see a series of imagery and allusions of how Gertrude acted toward the King. To indication how short a period of time it was between the Kings death and Gertrude’s remarriage we see an allusion of her funeral shoes not be old.

Also a metaphor is used comparing her to a Niobe at the funeral, and an allusion saying a beast would mourn longer than she did. These two literary devices work together to help start another important theme in Hamlet. This is the theme of appearance vs. reality. Gertrude appeared to be mournful and sorrowed at her husband’s death, but yet she marries his brother a month later. Shakespeare then takes two metaphors (Hamlet to Hercules and the King to Claudius) and compares them. This shows how different and superior the King was to his brother.

We see another allusion of Gertrude marring while the salt from her “Unrighteous tears,” are still on her face. This confirms the speed of her remarriage. The personification of tears also exemplifies the belief that Gertrude was acting to be sad. This is also appearance vs. reality. Then speed is personified to implement again how short the time span was.

The sheets are also personified to be incestuous. This demonstrates that with the speed of the marriage it is illegal by the church. Shakespeare then ends the soliloquy with the personification of Hamlet breaking his heart by holding his tongue. This exhibits to the read that Hamlet is going to have a hard time holding all this in, but that he must not say anything to his mother. The first soliloquy plays a major role of setting up two themes (corruption and appearance vs.

reality) and setting up conflict. It allows the reader to see into Hamlet’s mind and learn more about his character while possibilities of a conflict arise. The soliloquy also sets up a lot of background information. We learn about past events that other wise could not have been shown. The first soliloquy also sets a tone of frustration that continues until the second. Bibliography none Shakespeare Essays.

Hamlet By Shakespeare

Hamlet by Shakespeare Hamlet’s Sanity Hamlet appears to be insane, after Polonius’s death, in act IV scene II. There are indications, though, that persuade me to think other wise. Certainly, Hamlet has plenty of reasons to be insane at this point. His day has been hectic–he finally determined Claudius had killed his father, the chance to kill Claudius confronted him, he comes very close to convincing Gertrude that Claudius killed his father, he accidentally kills Polonius, and finally the ghost of his father visits him. These situations are enough to bring Hamlet to insanity, but he remains sharp and credible. Hamlet is able to make smart remarks to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, comparing then to sponges, “When he (Claudius) needs what you have gleaned, it is but squeezing you and, sponge, you shall be dry again,” (pg 98, 20). This is random and unexpected, as many of his actions, but the comparison makes sense; Rosencrantz and Guildenstern soak up all the kings favors, only to become dry again after they mop up the King’s mess (spying on Hamlet, and getting Polonius’s body). Later, with Claudius, Hamlet tells how lowly a king can be by saying, “A man (beggar) may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm,” (pg 99, 29). This also makes sense, and is not quite as random; when Hamlet confronts Claudius, and the king asks where Polonius is, Hamlet immediatly begins the comparison by telling Claudius that Polonuis is at supper (the worms are eating him for supper, and so on).

This proves that Hamlet had some kind of planning for this! degrading comment, and that his thoughts are not scattered and he is able to stay focused. There is a question of what being insane really is. Since it is agreeable that Ophelia was crazy, it’s possible to use her as a guide to make this argument valid. Hamlet and Ophelia both shared the trait of having calculated thoughts, Ophelia’s singing and Hamlet’s verbal attacks. They also shared calmness before their deaths. But was Hamlet spraying rude remarks to everyone before he died, as Ophelia had sung floating down the river? No, in-fact Hamlet was the opposite of what he was before.

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If he were crazy, like Ophelia, he would have remained hectic and random up until the time of (and after) the duel. Hamlet, though, was not–he even reasoned what death for him was, finishing his question of whether life was worth living for. Hamlet can truley be seen to be sane, and not. The facts that Hamlet was smart and swift thinking, and in such a reversal of emotions (from after Polonius died) in the end, leads strongly to the opinion that Hamlet was not insane.

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