Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson is one of the most well known poets of her time. Though her life was outwardly uneventful, what went on inside her house behind closed doors is unbelievable. After her father died she met Reverend Charles Wadsworth. She soon came to regard him as one of her most trusted friends, and she created in his image the lover whom she was never to know except in her imagination. It is also said that it was around 1812 when he was removed to San Fransico that she began her withdrawal from society.

During this time she began to write many of her poems. She wrote mainly in private, guarding all of her poems from all but a few select friends. She did not write for fame, but instead as a way of expressing her feelings. In her lifetime only six of her poems were even printed; none of which had her consent. It was not until her death of Brights Disease in May of 1862, that many of her poems were even read (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2837). Thus proving that the analysis on Emily Dickinsons poetry is some of the most emotionally felt works of the nineteenth century.

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Miss Dickinson is often compared with other poets and writers, but like Shakespeare, Miss Dickinson is without opinions (Tate 86). Her verses and technical license often seem mysterious and can confuse critics, but after all is said, it is realized that like most poets Miss Dickinson is no more mysterious than a banker. It is said that Miss Dickinsons life was starved and unfulfilled and yet all pity is misdirected. She lived one of the richest and deepest lives ever on this continent. It was her own conscious choice to deliberately withdraw from society into her upstairs room (Tate 83).

She kept to only a few select friends and the storm, wind, wild March sky, sunsets, dawns, birds, bees, and butterflies were sufficient companionship for Miss Dickinson (Loomis 79). She dealt with a lot both physically and psychologically and in the end she still came out on the top. So as Allen Tate best said it in her own historical setting Miss Dickinson is nevertheless remarkable and special (82). Thomas Higginson said that the main quality of her poems is that of extraordinary grasp and insight, uttered with an uneven vigor, which was all her own (78). The works and phrases she uses shows that she was unconcerned with the fact that no one else could understand her poetry, but instead, she was satisfied by using mere words in order to fit her own ear (Higginson 78).

Miss Dickinsons poetry was strictly confidential and written without the purpose of publication and merely as a way of expressing her own mind (Bloom 2838). Art forms were totally unknown to her, and nature was always viewed not in a cosmic way but in its smallest and most intimate forms (Whicher 87). Allen Tate describes her biggest influence to be nature itself, and though she could not deal with the problems of society, she had such an attitude toward life that she was able to see into this character of nature more deeply than any other (84). Miss Dickinsons poetry style contains flashes of wholly original and profound insight into nature and life (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2841). At first impression her tiny lyrics appear to be no more than the jottings of a half-idiotic school-girl instead of grave musings of a full grown, fully educated woman (Monro 81). Miss Dickinson often writes out of habit allowing her poems to not require a point of view, but instead, they require for some of the deepest understanding, which allows her style to emerge even when she has nothing to say (Tate 86-87). Some consider her works to be the most original of her time, written with an unusual amount of emotion and often referred to as poetry torn up by its roots with rain, dew and earth still clinging to them (Higginson 78).

To others she was considered to be intellectually blind, partially dead, and mostly dumb to the art of poetry (Monro 81). It was best stated by Allen Tate when he wrote, she can not reason at all; she can only see (84). Although her poems were written with deep intensity, it seems that her favorite themes were thunderstorms, sunsets, and snow, and yet at the same time they were all somehow related to some angle of her house or garden (Whicher 87). There also remained a deep sense of mystery and a desire to know the why of things (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2841). Harold Bloom said, her best poetry is not concerned with the causes but with the qualities of pain (19), which allows her to deal with the feelings that the God of her fathers, when she most wished to lean on Him, was disconcertingly not there (Whicher 87).

Throughout her poetry there runs a current of sadness with just a touch of sparkling humor (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2845) issuing her poems a tension between the abstraction and sensation in which the two elements may be distinguished logically but not really (Tate 84). Her symbol of nature was death, and her only weapon against death was her faith (Tate 84). She realizes that it is when a mans faith runs dry that he must refresh his soul with the sanity, which lies only in nature (Whicher 87). Miss Dickinson possessed an extremely unconventional and grotesque fancy. Blakes mysticism and Emersons mannerism held a very strong influence on her style (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2841). She wrote for no one except herself and often about death, burial and the unknown life beyond, leaving every ground open for legitimate study (Todd 78).

Miss Dickinson lived much of her life alone and rarely even left her fathers house. She dwelt in seclusion, socially, physically, and psychologically (Monro 81). It wasnt because she was an invalid, rather, Miss Dickinson became a hermit by deliberate and conscious choice (Tate 83). She had tried society and found it lacking (Todd 78). Allen Tate writes, if it were necessary to describe her seclusion with disappointment in love there would remain the problem between what her seclusion produced and how it was viewed (Tate 83).

Her most vivid symbol would be nature, and this is where she allows so many of her deepest feelings to run free. Nature allows Miss Dickinson to be herself and to find herself. This is her only connection to her God, and it is in nature that she finds her strengths. She believes that there is a God, but where he is, she does not know. The only thing she feels sure about is the fact that she is going to die, and when she does, her soul will live on in some way. Her seclusion is a main factor because she wishes to separate herself from the outside, creating in her a more simple heart. She believes that once a person is alone from the world they are separated from the corruption.

Miss Dickinson made this choice to deal with her own depression in this way. Miss Dickinson may have been very psychologically disturbed, but the impact she has left on our society is amazing. No other poet could compare with the deep emotion that is so carefully placed in her works. She has amazed many critics with her forms and she will continue to do so as long as people will take the time to not only read her poems in their heads but also with their minds, hearts, and souls.

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson was born on December 10, 1830 in Amherst Massachusetts. She had a younger sister named Lavina and an older brother named Austin. Her mother Emily Norcross Dickinson, was largely dependent on her family and was seen by Emily as a bad mother. Her father was lawyer, Congressman, and the Treasurer for Amherst College. Emilys mother and father didnt get along very well, but unlike her mother Emily loved and admired her father.

Emilys family lived a quiet secure life. They rarely shared their problems with one another so Emily had plenty of privacy for writing. During her childhood, Emily and her family attended The First Congregational Church on every Sunday. Emily did not like going to church because she didn’t think of herself as being very religious. She refused to believe that Heaven was a better place than Earth and eventually rebelled from the church.

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Emily saw herself as a woman who had her own way of thinking, a way of thinking shaped neither by the church or society. By the time she was twelve, her family moved to a house on Pleasant Street where they lived from 1840 to 1855. Emily was already writing letters, but composed most of her poetry in this home. Emily only left home to attend Mount Holyoke Female Seminary for two semesters. She impressed her teachers with her “courage and directness” in her poetry.

They felt her writing was very good. At the age of twenty-one, Emily and her family moved to the “Dickinson Homestead” on Main Street. This move was very difficult for Emily. This was difficult for Emily because she became very attached to her old house. They now lived next door to her brother Austin and his wife Susan and their daughter Martha.

Emily and Susan became so close that many people believe they may have been lovers. Emily was known to have written many love letters and poems to Susan. Martha attempted to protect both of their images and tell everyone the rumors werent true. It became common knowledge that Emily had some type of very strong feelings for Susan. The following is one of the letters that Emily wrote to Susan: “It’s a sorrowful morning Susie–the wind blows and it rains; “into each life some rain must fall,” and I hardly know which falls fastest, the rain without, or within–Oh Susie, I would nestle close to your warm heart, and never hear the wind blow, or the storm beat, again.

Is there any room there for me, darling, and will you “love me more if ever you come home”?–it is enough, dear Susie, I know I shall be satisfied. But what can I do towards you? dearer you cannot be, for I love you so already, that it almost breaks my heart–perhaps I can love you anew, every day of my life, every morning and evening–Oh if you will let me, how happy I shall be! The precious billet, Susie, I am wearing the paper out, reading it over and o’er, but the dear thoughts cant wear out if they try, Thanks to Our Father, Susie! Vinnie and I talked of you all last evening long, and went to sleep mourning for you, and pretty soon I waked up saying “Precious treasure, thou art mine,” and there you were all right, my Susie, and I hardly dared to sleep lest someone steal you away. Never mind the letter, Susie; you have so much to do; just write me every week one line, and let it be, “Emily, I love you,” and I will be satisfied! Your own, Emily” http://www.sappho.com/poetry/historical/e *censored*in.html At the age of thirty-one Emily sent some of her poems to a publisher, Thomas Higginson, who liked her poetry a lot. A strong friendship developed. He gave her a lot of advice, but she never seemed to use any of it.

It became evident that she didn’t like the idea of having her works published, she made 40 packets of about twenty poems apiece from 814 poems. She placed these in a box along with close to 300 other poems. Emily died on May 5, 1886 at the age of 56. She had planned her own funeral. It was held at the mansion on Main Street and ended at the family plot near the house on Pleasant Street. At her request, her casket was covered with violets and pine boughs, while she herself was dressed in a new white gown and had a strand of violets placed about her neck.

Before she died, Emily left specific instructions for her sister and a housemaid, Maggie to destroy all the letters she had received and saved. The box of packets and poems was found with these letters, but Emily had not said anything about destroying them. Her sister Lavina was determined to have these published, but Susan kept them for two years before they were released to Higginson. In 1890 and 1891, some of the poems were published. They received a great response, but no more were released until 1955, when the rest of her poems were published.

Though she was not religious it is said that many of her poems do reflect religious views. She wrote many of her poems on pain, death, and suffering, although a lot were also written about love, lust, and romance. A lot of people see her as a hermit who spent much of her life writing and living by herself. She chose her words for her poems in a way that allows the reader to choose the meaning of the poem to them and relate it to their life. She wrote nearly eighteen hundred poems, most staying away from rhyme and punctuation.

Emilys poems did not have titles because she never wanted them to be published. Many of her poems are a little hard to interpret, but after reading this hopefully you will have a little bit better understanding of her life. Bibliography American Authors pgs. 25-48. “Emily Elizabeth Dickinson,” Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia 99. Microsoft Corporation. Lebita, Edzen.

“Emily Dickinson, a few selected poems” February 20th,2000 http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Lights/4192/di ckinson.html President and fellows of Harvard College, “Virtual Emily” February 20th, 2000 http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/index1.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1813.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1830.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1840.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1855.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1860.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1874.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1886.html http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~emilypg/1955.html http://www.sappho.com/poetry/historical/e dickin.html.

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson lived in an era of Naturalism and Realism (1855-1910). She lived
in a period of The Civil War and the Frontier. She was affected by her life and
the era she lived in. She also had many deaths in her family and thats part
of the reason that she was very morbid and wrote about death. Emily Dickinson
grew up in Amherst, Massachusetts in the nineteenth century. As a child she was
brought up into the Puritan way of life. She was born on December 10, 1830 and
died fifty-six years later. Emily lived isolated in the house she was born in;
except for the short time she attended Amherst Academy and Holyoke Female
Seminary. Emily Dickinson never married and lived on the reliance of her father.

Dickinson was close to her sister Lavinia and her brother Austin her whole life.

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Most of her family were members of the church, but Emily never wished to become
one. Her closest friend was her sister-in-law Susan. Susan was Emily’s personal
critic; as long as Emily was writing she asked Susan to look her poems over.

Emily Dickinson was affected by her life for several reasons. One of the reasons
was that she was never married, though she went through many serious
relationships, she never settled down. Another reason that she was affected by
her life was that her mother was not emotionally accessible. She was not
close to her mother and never shared any of her feelings with her, which most
daughters feel they can. This might have caused Emily to be very weird and
strange. The Dickinson children were also raised in the Christian tradition, and
were expected to take up their fathers religious beliefs and values without
any fighting or arguing. Emily did not like than she can not chose for herself
her own beliefs and religion. Emily did not enjoy the popularity and excitement
of the public life, unlike her father. So she began to pull away from it. In the
presence of strangers Emily could be shy, silent or even depreciating. Emily
felt that she did not fit in with her and her fathers religion in Amherst
especially when he father started to censor the books she read because of their
potential to draw her away from faith. Emily had no extended exposure to the
world outside of her hometown. Besides the one trip she took to Philadelphia
(which was only due to her eye problems) and occasional trips to Washington and
Boston. On her trip to Philadelphia Emily met Charles Wadsworth, a clergyman,
who became her dearest earthly friend. Just like Emily he was also a
solitary, and a romantic person that Emily could confide in when writing her
poetry. His religious beliefs also gave Emily a sharp, and often welcome. He was
a very influential and was a big source of inspiration and guidance. She also
met a man by the name of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who was also very
influential to Emily. He advised Dickinson against publishing her poetry, even
though he saw the creative originality on her poetry. He remained Emilys
preceptor for the rest of her life. But Emily decided against publishing
her poems, and as a result only seven of her poems were published in her
lifetime (she left behind over 2,000 poems). Emily Dickinson was affected by her
era. When the United States Civil War broke out there was a lot of emotional
confusion, and she began to express this in her poems. Some changes in her
poetry came directly as a result of the war. Even though she looked inner and
not to the war for the material in her poetry, the tense atmosphere of the war
years may have contributed a lot to her writings. After the war she started to
look at things through a black vale, and began to be very dark and gloomy. But
probably one of her best poems was written during this periods of decline. It
was called A Route of Evanescence. This poem described the fluttering rise
of a humming bird. This unpredictable rise was also the route of experience.

Emilys life started to go down from this point and nothing good was happening
for her anymore. There were many points in her life where she was not happy and
actually very few points were she was happy and satisfied with her life. She
expressed all this in a poem she writes called Crumbling in not an
instants Act. This poems tells how crumbling does

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson is one of the most well known poets of her time.Though her life was outwardly uneventful, what went on inside her house behind closed doors is unbelievable.After her father died she met Reverend Charles Wadsworth.She soon came to regard him as one of her most trusted friends, and she created in his image the lover whom she was never to know except in her imagination.It is also said that it was around 1812 when he was removed to San Fransico that she began her withdrawal from society.During this time she began to write many of her poems.She wrote mainly in private, guarding all of her poems from all but a few select friends.She did not write for fame, but instead as a way of expressing her feelings.In her lifetime only six of her poems were even printed; none of which had her consent.It was not until her death of Brights Disease in May of 1862, that many of her poems were even read (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2837).Thus proving that the analysis on Emily Dickinsons poetry is some of the most emotionally felt works of the nineteenth century.


Miss Dickinson is often compared with other poets and writers, but like Shakespeare, Miss Dickinson is without opinions (Tate 86).Her verses and technical license often seem mysterious and can confuse critics, but after all is said, it is realized that like most poets Miss Dickinson is no more mysterious than a banker.It is said that Miss Dickinsons life was starved and unfulfilled and yet all pity is misdirected.She lived one of the richest and deepest lives ever on this continent.It was her own conscious choice to deliberately withdraw from society into her upstairs room (Tate 83).She kept to only a few select friends and the storm, wind, wild March sky, sunsets, dawns, birds, bees, and butterflies were sufficient companionship for Miss Dickinson (Loomis 79).She dealt with a lot both physically and psychologically and in the end she still came out on the top.So as Allen Tate best said it in her own historical setting Miss Dickinson is nevertheless remarkable and special (82).

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For You For Only $13.90/page!


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Thomas Higginson said that the main quality of her poems is that of extraordinary grasp and insight, uttered with an uneven vigor, which was all her own (78).The works and phrases she uses shows that she was unconcerned with the fact that no one else could understand her poetry, but instead, she was satisfied by using mere words in order to fit her own ear (Higginson 78).Miss Dickinsons poetry was strictly confidential and written without the purpose of publication and merely as a way of expressing her own mind (Bloom 2838).Art forms were totally unknown to her, and nature was always viewed not in a cosmic way but in its smallest and most intimate forms (Whicher 87).Allen Tate describes her biggest influence to be nature itself, and though she could not deal with the problems of society, she had such an attitude toward life that she was able to see into this character of nature more deeply than any other (84).


Miss Dickinsons poetry style contains flashes of wholly original and profound insight into nature and life (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2841).At first impression her tiny lyrics appear to be no more than the jottings of a half-idiotic school-girl instead of grave musings of a full grown, fully educated woman (Monro 81).Miss Dickinson often writes out of habit allowing her poems to not require a point of view, but instead, they require for some of the deepest understanding, which allows her style to emerge even when she has nothing to say (Tate 86-87).Some conside…..r her works to be the most original of her time, written with an unusual amount of emotion and often referred to as poetry torn up by its roots with rain, dew and earth still clinging to them (Higginson 78).To others she was considered to be intellectually blind, partially dead, and mostly dumb to the art of poetry (Monro 81).It was best stated by Allen Tate when he wrote, she can not reason at all; she can only see (84).


Although her poems were written with deep intensity, it seems that her favorite themes were thunderstorms, sunsets, and snow, and yet at the same time they were all somehow related to some angle of her house or garden (Whicher 87).There also remained a deep sense of mystery and a desire to know the why of things (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2841).


Harold Bloom said, her best poetry is not concerned with the causes but with the qualities of pain (19), which allows her to deal with the feelings that the God of her fathers, when she most wished to lean on Him, was disconcertingly not there (Whicher 87).Throughout her poetry there runs a current of sadness with just a touch of sparkling humor (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2845) issuing her poems a tension between the abstraction and sensation in which the two elements may be distinguished logically but not really (Tate 84).


Her symbol of nature was death, and her only weapon against death was her faith (Tate 84).She realizes that it is when a mans faith runs dry that he must refresh his soul with the sanity, which lies only in nature (Whicher 87).


Miss Dickinson possessed an extremely unconventional and grotesque fancy.Blakes mysticism and Emersons mannerism held a very strong influence on her style (Chelsea House of Library Criticism 2841).She wrote for no one except herself and often about death, burial and the unknown life beyond, leaving every ground open for legitimate study (Todd 78).


Miss Dickinson lived much of her life alone and rarely even left her fathers house.She dwelt in seclusion, socially, physically, and psychologically (Monro 81).It wasnt because she was an invalid, rather, Miss Dickinson became a hermit by deliberate and conscious choice (Tate 83).She had tried society and found it lacking (Todd 78).Allen Tate writes, if it were necessary to describe her seclusion with disappointment in love there would remain the problem between what her seclusion produced and how it was viewed (Tate 83).


Her most vivid symbol would be nature, and this is where she allows so many of her deepest feelings to run free.Nature allows Miss Dickinson to be herself and to find herself.This is her only connection to her God, and it is in nature that she finds her strengths.She believes that there is a God, but where he is, she does not know.The only thing she feels sure about is the fact that she is going to die, and when she does, her soul will live on in some way.


Her seclusion is a main factor because she wishes to separate herself from the outside, creating in her a more simple heart.She believes that once a person is alone from the world they are separated from the corruption.Miss Dickinson made this choice to deal with her own depression in this way.


Miss Dickinson may have been very psychologically disturbed, but the impact she has left on our society is amazing. No other poet could compare with the deep emotion that is so carefully placed in her works.She has amazed many critics with her forms and she will continue to do so as long as people will take the time to not only read her poems in their heads but also with their minds, hearts, and souls.

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