Antigone

Antigone In the lines I recited, Haemon makes points that touch my heart, mind, and soul. What he pronounces speaks to modern day society as much as it did to ancient society. Sophocles points show through this monologue clearly, which is common to greek literature. Edith Hamilton referred to their literature as plain, direct, and “matter of fact (46)”. Hamilton often refers to how greek writers forced their readers to think and expand, rather than filling their pages with repition and fancy.

Haemon bluntly states “But other men can reason rightly too (4)” to his father. He is expressing how reason is important and should not be criticized, but neither should the reason of other men. He later goes to ask his father not to “entrench yourself in your opinion/ as if everyone else was wrong (23-24).” Haemon attempted to stress how the city felt that Antigone should be considered a hero, “Should not her name be writ in gold? (16)” However, the common man would not stand up to Creon and speak his mind. Haemon took it upon himself, as an outsider on the inside, to listen to the city, and relay this information to his father, “As your son, you see, I find myself marking every word, and act, and comment of the crowd, to gauge the temper of the simple citizen (5-7).” This is an important message throughout the play, and when Creon did not listen to the town, it resulted in disaster. Haemon warned him of this when he said, “The kind of man who always thinks that he is right, that his opinions, his pronouncements, are the final word, is usually exposed as hollow as they come (25-28).” Creon was exposed, and left alone.

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Ignoring the reason of his son and his city, his own convictions led to the result of tragedy Bibliography Sophocles Trilogy, Sophocles. Haemon Press 1961.

Antigone

Antigone And Laws A crucial question in Antigone is, “When someone makes a law that is known by the public to be morally wrong, should the public break his/her law? Or should they collaborate with that person by obeying? Antigone felt that the law (no one was supposed to bury her brother Polyneicies) should be broken so she took what she thought to be appropriate measures. This is called Civil Disobedience. Another question is “Is Civil Disobedience morally and ethically correct?” The Nazis say one thing, and the Vietnam war veterans say one thing. The Nazis did not believe that Civil Disobedience was ethically or morally righteous, because of there inhumane acts upon the Jews in the 1940s probably led some Nazi officials to think about Civil Disobedience, after all the were told to do a job and if they didnt they would have been killed. As Adolph Hitler showed the world, just because one idiotic person thinks something is right that doesnt make it right.

The Nazi officials parallel Ismene, because there is a law that they both knew to be wrong but they are so afraid to step up that they just collaborate with it. Another parallel is that the Jews and Polyneicies soul. The Jews were caught up in the middle of the officials, the liberating nations, and Adolph Hitler. As was Polyneicies soul caught in between Creon, Antigone, and Ismene. Also, in that they both had to undergo extreme pain, torture, and horror.

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Lastly the invading nations parallel Antigone in that they both fought against the law in both their times. Antigone fought to save her brothers spirit, and the invading nations fought to save the Jews. Civil disobedience is wrong even though it might not go with any religious beliefs, but for Christians, laws are established by governments, governments are established by God, so what is there to go against besides Gods own law? Laws are made for the communities own safety, or own good. If a law was passed not to stay outside because of serial killings how many would stay outside late at night, not to many. A law was passed not to steal, how many people are arrested and convicted every week because they stole something.

So laws are for the benefit of that area, in order to uphold that law there must be a price of punishment. During the Vietnam conflict there was a military draft, some ran to Canada in order to save their own life. Our dear President William “Bill” Clinton ran to Canada to avoid having to go to war. If you live in a country with equal rights you at least owe that country something. The Vietnam veterans think this example of Civil Disobedience, is exceptionally wrong.

“When someone makes a law that is known by the public to be wrong?” Then they should be collaborated with. The Jews would say it is alright to break this particular law. The Vietnam veterans would say it is not acceptable to break that law. The real answer is that there is no real answer, because some say it is alright, and some say it is not right.

Antigone

Antigone ANTIGONE In the story of Antigone, two very headstrong people’s beliefs are matched up against each other. Creon, the king, made it law that no traitor to the Kingdom shall have a proper burial, instead they will be left laying on the ground to rot and to be eaten by the animals. This was the case of Antigone’s brother, Polyneices. Antigone’s love for her brother was so great that she went against the law, eventhough she knew Creon’s punishment for breaking the law was public stoning, which ultimately resulted in death. Creon, who had an equal amount of determination, refused to back down from his law for his own reasons even after Antigone ignored it. He could not submit himself to the will of a woman. At that time, women were looked at as being in the same class as slaves.

If he did, it would have showed weakness in him and the people would have overthrown him for letting a woman have that effect on him. So instead of the public stoning, Creon sentenced Antigone to die in a cave where she could starve to death. Instead of dying a slow miserable death, she committed suicide by hanging herself. As it turns out, this set off a string of events for the king that he could have never saw coming. The first of the tragic events that would unfold was the death of his son.

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Haemon was Creon and Eurydice’s son and was next in line to the throne with Antigone as his wife. Creon’s son was set to be married to Antigone, but after Creon sentenced her to death, Haemon turned on his father. He was outraged that Creon had taken away his future wife, in which he was very much in love with. He was so outraged, that he would even break the unique and special bond between father and son. Haemon felt incomplete without Antigone and could not stand being apart from her.

He found away to solve his problem and get revenge on his father at the same time. He had taken his own life and at the same time killed the future of the family’s place in the throne. Creon was crushed at what his son did, especially hearing it from someone else. After hearing of Haemon’s death, Eurydice was completely devastated and felt some what violated. She felt Creon was responsible for the death of not only Haemon, but for Megareus who was killed some years before.

Haemon was the only son left for Eurydice and the last only one left to inherit the throne. Eurydice’s life had gone from having a picture book ending to becoming a true, old fashioned tragedy. Her last remaining son was a short time away from marrying a beautiful young woman and starting their lives together, its every mothers wish for their son. First her son’s fiancee dies by suicide and then her son is torn from her life in an instant. It was too much to happen to one person in such a short amount of time. Not too many people can handle events like that, including Eurydice.

She also found the same solution as her son. She did not want to live with such great sadness and could not live with Creon anymore. After all he had been responsible for the two deaths that greatly affected her life. Things could not possibly be worse for Creon, his son and his wife are dead, and there’s no one to inherit the throne in his family. He knows that he was the cause of all this misery that surrounds him.

He was now paying the price for such an unfair judgment against Antigone. If he had a second chance to do things over, he surely would have done things much differently. He realized that his ruling was not worth all the pain, guilt, and suffering he caused. It would not have been so bad if they had not committed suicide, but Haemon killed himself holding Antigone, his love, and his mother killed herself violently with a sword. Creon’s head fills with suicidal thoughts and begins to break down. In the end, he does almost nothing but pray for death.

Although the story ends with him leaving with these types of thoughts, one can only imagine he met the same fate as his son and wife. In conclusion, it is obvious to see the repercussions of Creon’s faithfulness to his beliefs. He had basically lost everything, his wife and son were gone, he would not be able to maintain his position as king, and he had lost all self control. The people would have overthrown him if he continued. This was all due to the fact that he made one really wrong ruling.

Too much power and control cause an increase in arrogance and can cause some people to make totally irrational thoughts. If Creon had continued to rule, these events hopefully would have taught him to consider what happens to the people with such harsh laws. Creon could have easily avoided all this if he had actually thought about what might happen if one of the law breakers was some one in his own family. Book Reports.

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